ABA & children with Medi-Cal

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Disability Rights California, National Health Law Program, and Western Center on Law and Poverty are conducting an investigation regarding the provision of Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) Therapy to children in Medi-Cal.  ABA is an evidence-based, clinically proven treatment for children with autism and autism spectrum disorders. 

Some children have received ABA through regional centers, private health insurance, or their school districts.  In California, some children received this benefit through the Healthy Families program, but lost it when their benefits transitioned to Medi-Cal.  Other Medi-Cal eligible children had ABA through regional center but lost it when they turned three, because they did not continue to qualify for regional center services.  Other children may have been recommended to receive ABA, but have never been able to receive it because Medi-Cal does not pay for it and they are not regional center consumers and/or their school district will not provide it.

Please contact the following people if you or anyone you know of may fit the profile below: 

They are looking for Children who:

  1. Are age 7 or under (preferably under age 4) and diagnosed with an autistic spectrum disorder.
  2. Have had an assessment by a health or other qualified professional which supports the need for your child to get ABA.
  3. Are not currently eligible for regional center services (including Early Start). This includes children who were found ineligible for Early Start and referred to Prevention Resource and Referral Programs (PRR) at Family Resource Centers.
  4. Are Medi-Cal recipients.
  5. Meet any of the following circumstances:
    1. Received ABA through Healthy Families and ABA was terminated prior to or on August 1, or will be terminated this fall.
    2. Medi-Cal recipient unable to access ABA through Medi-Cal.

This is not a research study, we are exploring ways to help children obtain benefits. 

 

Webinars – Talk About Curing Autism (TACA)

TACA will be holding webinars with featured physicians, researchers, attorneys, therapists and knowledgeable providers to help educate and empower families living with autism. Be sure to bookmark this page for more details. TACA Autism Journey Blueprints can be found: https://www.tacanow.org/family-resources/autism-journey-blueprints/

For upcoming webinars, click here: Webinars – Talk About Curing Autism (TACA).

Healthy Siblings: Considerations for Parents of Children with ASD

Siblings have the same susceptibilities and environmental exposures as their brother or sister with ASD. There are often co-morbid health conditions or health concerns that may be overlooked in the presence of the more pressing symptoms of their ASD sibling. This presentation looks at some of the more common health issues seen in families, and simple strategies to address the health and wellness of the entire family.

Presented by Kelly Barnhill, MBA, CN, CCN, Director of Clinical Services at The Johnson Center and Dr. Dane Mosher, Physician at The Johnson Center

Register here: Healthy Siblings: Considerations for Parents of Children with ASD.

Just because they don’t speak doesn’t mean they don’t understand

Reblogging from the TACA blog –
Please take this message to heart.
A few important tips:
Talk to your kids with autism just like you would talk to any child, but keep it simple. Let them know where you are going, what you are doing and WHY you are doing it.
Spend time with your child outside of therapy hugging them, telling them you love them and why you are fighting so hard. They will hear you.
Please (and I am begging) do not talk about your kids while they are there in front of you. If you are at appointments (doctor or therapist) have a babysitter attend to your child in a separate room when you get to any details that may hurt their feelings. Don’t share negative emotions and thoughts with others when your child is present in the same room.
Tell teachers and staff that work with your kids to do the same! Never talk negatively about any of the kids while they are there listening as well.

Moving Autism Forward by Team TACA

By Lisa Ackerman

words hurt2

This past weekend, we had our 11th annual Real Help Now Conference in Costa Mesa, California (1.) It was a great event to educate and empower TACA families. I always love these events. My favorite part is always watching the parents as they leave; now ready to tackle their next steps to help their children.

In the question and answer period a dad, friend to my family, reminded me of the most important lesson in the autism journey: “Just because they don’t talk doesn’t mean they don’t have something to say”. This lesson deserves to be shared. It needs to be yelled from the mountain tops!

Just in case you have not heard it before, here is my story: My son Jeff was typically developing until 15 months of age. He had almost 20 words and had met all the milestones in the baby books…

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